Posts tagged KELSEY KARPER
ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: DUNCAN

In the early 1980s a group of Duncan civic leaders established a task force to create a community center for their town. They sought a place where people could enjoy culture, entertainment, and recreation, which would contribute to the health and well-being of the local people and respond to needs expressed by the community.

Read More
ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: JENKS

Jenks, Oklahoma is the fastest-growing city in the state, according to the 2014 US Census data. During that year, Jenks’ population grew by 6.8%, even outpacing its nearby neighbor Tulsa, which saw just a .3% increase during the same time period. The growth in Jenks has been consistent over the last decade, prompting city leaders to consider additions and improvements to accommodate and retain new residents.

Read More
LAUNCHING ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY

Beginning January 1, 2016, Oklahomans for the Arts (OFTA) will launch a yearlong intensive effort to gather data about Oklahoma’s nonprofit arts and culture organizations and their audiences. Through this effort, we’ll learn about the investments these organizations are making in Oklahoma’s economy. We’ll also assess how audiences spend their money attending cultural events around the state. The Oklahoma study is part of Americans for the Arts‘ national Arts & Economic Prosperity 5.

Read More
ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: PRYOR

Strolling down Main Street in Pryor, Oklahoma, you’ll be hard pressed to find a vacant storefront. The street is alive with business, from book and gift stores to restaurants and Oklahoma’s longest continuously running movie theater (the Allred Theater, opened in 1902).

The street hosts a number of community events, such as the popular Pryor Main Street Chili Christmas Festival, with a sidewalk chalk art competition and a chili cook-off sanctioned by the International Chili Society.

Read More
ECONOMIC IMPACT: HOW NUMBERS ADD UP FOR THE ARTS

“As a field, economics deals with complex processes and studies substantial amounts of information. Economists use assumptions in order to simplify economic processes so that it is easier to understand.” (Source: Boundless Economics)

In a standing room only session at the recent Oklahoma Arts Conference, panelists: Thomas A. Anderson, Kay Decker, PhD, and John Robertson discussed the big picture of our economy and local ways to record the arts sector’s impact on economies.

Read More