Posts tagged economic development
ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: EDMOND

The city of Edmond’s public art collection is a testament to the power of public investment in the arts and an incentive for arts advocates to get serious about electing pro-arts candidates to municipal office.

Over the last two decades, elected officials in Edmond have intentionally built public art funds into the city’s budget. Mayors, notably Randel Shadid, and City Councilmembers have worked together to build the infrastructure that has resulted in a public art collection of over 150 pieces valued at over $3.5 million.

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ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: OKLAHOMA CITY (PART 1)

This case study is part of a series investigating the variety of ways that Oklahoma communities invest municipal resources and funding in the arts. These stories illustrate how these investments, big or small, can have a positive impact on citizens, civic pride, tourism, and the general well-being of a place and its people.

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ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: ALVA

The city of Alva invests in the arts through a combination of city/state partnerships and public/private partnerships. These partnerships function toward the goals of the Cultural District Initiative, (1) to increase Alva’s capacity for arts and cultural development, and (2) to cultivate inclusive improvement in social and economic life for residents of Alva.

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ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: MIAMI

Miami, Oklahoma is in the early stages of drafting and implementing a Cultural District Plan. Miami’s story is a useful template for communities wondering how to begin investing in arts and culture intentionally and systematically.

The recipe for Miami’s successful start has included good working relationships between arts leaders and civic leaders, a holistic vision for the role of the arts in Miami and a substantial dedication of time.

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ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: BARTLESVILLE

The City of Bartlesville understands the value of the arts for cultivating civic pride. And that long-standing disposition among civic leaders and community members has synthesized into a sustainable pro-arts culture in the city.

During Bartlesville’s boom oil years Phillips Petroleum brought substantial wealth to the city, and many residents and city officials wanted to invest in arts and culture to improve the city’s well-being and promote a positive sense of place.

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ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: PAWHUSKA

Pawhuska, Oklahoma’s vision to become the artistic destination on the Tallgrass Prairie for both artists and patrons is a useful template for municipalities trying to make the most of their history, geography, and local talent. The key to Pawhuska’s success has been connecting the dots to build a unified vision

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ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: ADA

Ada, Oklahoma is full of promising college students and passionate professors who would like to see more of those students stick around to invest in the city. Retaining young professionals after graduation is a mountain every college town tries to climb, and one that can feel steep in small-town Oklahoma.

Part of Ada’s answer is creating a young professional-friendly culture through the arts. The city has developed an Arts District and arts-friendly policies to encourage the growth of the arts sector so the sector can contribute to the city’s social and economic vitality.

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ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: MEDICINE PARK

When describing the cobblestone community of Medicine Park in southwest Oklahoma, residents and tourists alike use words like “magical,” “healing,” and “beautiful.” The community was founded in 1908 by Oklahoma Senator Elmer Thomas as the state’s first planned tourism resort. Taking advantage of the natural beauty at the gateway of the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge (established 1901), the resort began simply with a large Army tent with a wood floor, a swimming hole, and a limited number of campsites.

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ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: DUNCAN

In the early 1980s a group of Duncan civic leaders established a task force to create a community center for their town. They sought a place where people could enjoy culture, entertainment, and recreation, which would contribute to the health and well-being of the local people and respond to needs expressed by the community.

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ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: JENKS

Jenks, Oklahoma is the fastest-growing city in the state, according to the 2014 US Census data. During that year, Jenks’ population grew by 6.8%, even outpacing its nearby neighbor Tulsa, which saw just a .3% increase during the same time period. The growth in Jenks has been consistent over the last decade, prompting city leaders to consider additions and improvements to accommodate and retain new residents.

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ART OF COMMUNITY BUILDING: PRYOR

Strolling down Main Street in Pryor, Oklahoma, you’ll be hard pressed to find a vacant storefront. The street is alive with business, from book and gift stores to restaurants and Oklahoma’s longest continuously running movie theater (the Allred Theater, opened in 1902).

The street hosts a number of community events, such as the popular Pryor Main Street Chili Christmas Festival, with a sidewalk chalk art competition and a chili cook-off sanctioned by the International Chili Society.

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ECONOMIC IMPACT: HOW NUMBERS ADD UP FOR THE ARTS

“As a field, economics deals with complex processes and studies substantial amounts of information. Economists use assumptions in order to simplify economic processes so that it is easier to understand.” (Source: Boundless Economics)

In a standing room only session at the recent Oklahoma Arts Conference, panelists: Thomas A. Anderson, Kay Decker, PhD, and John Robertson discussed the big picture of our economy and local ways to record the arts sector’s impact on economies.

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